Here’s a fabulous frittata recipe from old Persia. It is one of many delish, easy dishes from the new Sarah Wilson book I Quit Sugar – Simplicious Flow (Pan Macmillan).  There are some beaut, super healthy dishes here! Chrissie Prezzie? Absolutely!

This traditional Persian frittata is heavier on herbs and greens (sabzi means ‘herbs’ in Farsi) and lighter on eggs than the regular Mediterranean take. Which suits me fine. A total Whatever You’ve Got greens bomb and a beaut way to get a whole lot of greens into your gullet, fast.

Serves 4

Ingredients

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 large leek, white and pale-green

parts only, finely chopped

5–6 packed cups roughly chopped

Whatever You’ve Got herbs and greens

(including the radish greens from the

serving suggestion below if you use

them, parsley, dill, coriander, celery

leaves, mint, chives etc)

5 organic eggs

11/2 teaspoons sea salt

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 teaspoons Turmeric Paste (page 199)

or 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric

1/2 cup walnuts

2 tablespoons barberries (optional)

To Serve

full-fat organic plain yoghurt or ricotta

Preserved Lemon (page 199)

sliced radish

Method

Heat the olive oil in a 25 cm skillet over medium heat. Cook the leek, stirring occasionally, until soft and translucent (about 10 minutes). Remove from the heat.

While the leek cools, place the rest of the ingredients, except the walnuts and barberries, in a blender and blitz. Pour the mixture over the leek and stir briefly to combine. Return the pan to medium heat, cover with a lid or plate and cook for about 8 minutes until the bottom starts to set (the top will still be soft and runny).

Remove the cover, then slide the pan under a grill heated to high for about 1 minute to slightly brown the top. Let cool slightly, then scatter over the nuts and berries. Serve straight from the pan with yoghurt or ricotta, preserved lemon and radish.

Barberries WTF? Barberries are small dried, bright red berries with a pleasantly sharp citrus flavour. They’re produced in Iran and easy to find online.

 

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